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and the election she has been given until tuesday to step down. >>> preserving powers for the military they talk about egypt, plus. >> i'm rob reynolds in bangladesh of the appalling conditions in this country's cannerys. >> i'm with sport including. >> they were some of the best young players they have ever seen and now they celebrate their success. ♪ the prime minister told the country she will do anything to stop the violence but cannot accept the demands of protesters and she was speaking after another day of violence in bangkok where people are trying to force her out of office and unhappy when she tried to introduce an amnesty law and brother and former brother return to the country. these are live pictures from bangkok where there has been violence between police and protesters already, people are on the streets but the rallies has not gained momentum in the past few days and there is an olive branch and she says she is open to talks. >> translator: i insist on opening every avenue to find the solution and i'm open for negotiations. police officers will not use violence but it's necess
karzai said he would not sign it until after elections next year. >> protesters in ukraine returned to the streets in force. the president met with russian president vladimir putin. the meeting sparked fears an economic deal may be reached and russia, furthering the distance with the european union. >> there are reports that the ukrainian leader viktor ych signed a deal with russia securing, according to reports, $17 billion worth of aid. you -- ukraine, of course, needs the money to pay its creditors. the country's reserves are running live. it's in dire economic circumstances. these reports about the deal with russia are unconfirmed. of course they spread more anger amongst the demonstrators here in independent square in central kiev because, of course, they want ukraine to go towards the european union and it was failure to sign a deal with the e.u. that prompted all the protests. and on sunday they are planning the big one. they want to repeat the kind of successful mobilisation that they had last weekend here, and they desperately need to keep this momentum going, because they
of preventing bloodshed. >> in a two-day seminar, francis hollande is calling for elections from the central african republic by removing the rebels who took control. >> at the end of the two day summit the french together the opportunity of having so many on and talk about the pressing subject, the central african republic. there were plans for the troops to disarm rebels, getting militia into their bases and get the armed men off the street. in the longer terms reducing tensions in the country. >> now, part of the enforcements are an enlargement of the french contingent. there are now 1600 french troops in the central african republic. france is engaged in mali. in the longer turn it wants to turn over african policing to african police keeping forces. france is engaged in two countries for time to come. >> a u.s. veteran is back home with his family after being held in north korea for more than a merrill newman arrives home today. his family called his time in north korea, "a difficult ordeal." melissa chan with that story. >> when merrill newman made the trip to remote north korea, he wo
in paris. the french president is calling for elections by 2015 to remove rebels who took control earlier this year. much of the u.s. is in the grip of a freezing. four homeless people froze to death. in california the ploughs can hardly keep up with the snow. the cold snap made driving dangerous, including the midwest. by inch. 4 numbers of in blooming tonne in indiana. snow and ice in the mid-atlantic. washington d.c. will be under a 24 hour storm watch. it is cold out there, and it looks like it will get colder. >> it's weather fit for polar bears and penn gins. the air is breaking out across the area. let's start where the storm begins, which is west coast. this storm is making its way over to the east coast, impacting the spire united states. we had wind gusts 36 miles per hour in san francisco. doesn't sound like much, but they have gotten a polar snap. it's 39 for vegas. it's not quite freezing, but we have the freezing temperatures to the north central area, and we'll be below freezing in california. i don't think there'll be much dreaming going on, there's be a lot of heaters cli
cast their ballot in the first democratic election. this morning applause for the first black voter. mandela became the country's president, the first elected by all of its people. >> we are all south africans. we have had a good fight but now this is a time to heal the old wound and to build a new south africa. ♪ >> reporter: after ruling for five years, nelson mandela passed the torch to the next generation and became an elder statesman to the world, a fighter, a visionary. the voice of his people and more accomplished. >> abc news. >> today following his passing the new south african president, president zuma said our nation has lost its greatest son and our people have lost a father. >> a man whose fighting spirit was matched by his humility and compassion. few hew human beings present either one of those sides in the amount that he did and he had both. >> absolutely. [ dad ] ah! lily... she pretty much lives in her favorite princess dress. and she's not exactly tidy. even if she gets a stain she'll wear it for a week straight. so i use tide to get out those week old stains an
that when interest rates go up after the election, it will detonate a sub-prime debt crisis of his making? >> the greatest danger in terms of interest rates would be to have a government who believed in more borrowing, more spending, and more taxing. that is what would drive up interest rates, that is what would hit the cost of living and that is what every family in this country should dread. >> order. >> you're been watching prime minister's questions. question time cares on c-span2 every wednesday. again on sunday night at 9:00 p.m. eastern on c-span. you can watch anytime at c- span.org. on the next washington journal, what to expect from healthcare.gov afternoon fixes. scott wilson joins us. health careon state exchanges and online enrollment compared to the federal exchange. in recognition of the 150th anniversary, a discussion about the law and dealing with whistleblowers and its effectiveness. plus, your calls, e-mails and tweets on "washington journal" on c-span. social media is an old idea. we think it is recent and only people alive today have done it. there's a very long and r
in 1993p. the following year in the first mixed race election in south africa's history nelson mandela was elected president. >> today is a day like no other before it. >> reporter: we were the first to interview him on that first morning as president elect. mandela tempered south africa's joy when he said healing his country would take time. >> it cannot be done overnight. it is going to take a year, two years, even as much as five years. so help me god. >> reporter: from enemy of the state to head of state, nelson mandela's walk to freedom became a journey shared by his entire nation. >> i have never been so excited and hopeful in my life in south africa as i am now. >> reporter: years later, nelson mandela paid a return visit to his former prison cell, this time accompanied by president bill clinton, who later presented him with the congressional gold medal. mandela stepped down as president in 1999, but he lived long enough to see the united states elect its own black president. >> so help me god. >> reporter: and in 2011 he was paid a visit in south africa by first lady michelle o
after election. hagel did address the issue. >> the minister of defense assured me that the b.s.a. would be signed. >> the defense ministers will meet in february on afghanistan. >> mark morgan is here with the supports headlines. the college football regular season is almost over. >> i got the sense you want an upset tonight. >> i always root for the underdog, no matter what. >> stay tuned. we're going to see what happens tonight, how this plays out. the task is clear, a win for each team tonight and they will square off in the b.c.s. title game january 6. the seminoles are heavy favorites to beat duke in the a.c.c. championship became and ohio state is expected to have a tougher time in the big 10 title game, thes buckeyes taking on 1-loss michigan state. a loss by either would open the door for others to slide in the national title game. >> robinson cano is bolting the bronx, agreeing to a stunning 10 year, $240 million contract with the seattle mariners. it will be the third largest contract in baseball history. last season with the yankees, cano and beltran hit 296 for the cardinals
opportunities for him to regain ground. the last time was followed by a whole election year when he secondake his case for a term, defend his record. this time, you don't have a moment like that where he could say, give me another chance. so it will be a lot harder for like dig out of a hole this. >> even with three more yearles to go? inwhat point does the public washington, d.c. start to look ahead to the next president? >> quickly, given our media environment for one. and you highlighted another obstacle he's facing and trying perceptions are set. and increasingly, the closer we 2016, the there are going to be more and more fixed. o that's a big challenge the white house faces. >> you want to talk to him about president obama, the legacy, how he's dealing with the most recent issues. healthcare.gov, the rollout of the website. the criticism he received. call.us a the phone lines there. 202-585-3881. democrats, 3880. 202-55-32882. on l take your comments e-mail and facebook and twitter. i want to ask you about the end of october. inattention to detail may hurt the presidential legacy. talk
. on february 11th, 1990. the world rejoiced. he worked with his former enemy to move toward free elections and the end of apartheid. he and frederik willem de klerk were jointly awarded the nobel peace prize in 1993 and the following year this, the world again looked on in wonder and joy as millions of black south africans lined up to vote for the first time. nelson mandela was elected president in a landslide. >> so help me god. >> reporter: a few months later at his inauguration attended by scores of world leaders, he declared a new era for his beloved country. >> never again shall it be that this beautiful land will again experience the oppression of one by another. >> reporter: terry moran, abc news. >> now what happens next is nelson mandela's body has already been moved to the hospital. he will be given a state funeral. not only that, but all of the flags will be at half staff until the funeral is over. there's a ten-day mourning period for south africans, which obviously starts now. >> just amazing. it's a life that goes beyond anything a book or hollywood could ever make up. truly
prize recipient and was elected president in the country's first free elections. the post apartheid years were unemployment and aids plagued the country. the 91-year-old mandela, who at fault for years to host the world cup, appeared on the pitch. in his later years, he battled illness, in and out of the hospital. he virtually moved to his home village to be closer to his family. waned,luence never hosting a number of visitors, including first lady michelle obama. it also mandela became a living symbol of freedom -- nelson mandela became a living symbol of freedom and the strength of south africa and freedom beyond. has already begun at the south african embassy. hassle fella has more. >> at the south african embassy, a real-life reminder of this man's life and legacy. in front of the embassy, the nine foot statue made of bronze, designed by a south african sculptor, modeled after images of mandela back in 1990. the closed fist, almost signaling victory. he was jailed 27 years three decades ago, at the very spot where dozens of protesters, americans included, who were arrested becau
democrat exly elected black president. he chronicled end of apartheid and mandela's election and serving as african correspondent for the bbc. tom, thanks for joining us today with your thoughts. and what were they when you first got the news that mandela pass ad way? >> i had a lot of emotions both at a personal level and a professional one. i had the same feelings that everyone had, this was absolute titan of the global stage whose like we'll probably never see in our lifetimes again. these sort of men only only come around everyone hundred years or some i have memories when i met him during the time i was in south africa, particularly of his personal warmth and humor. i remember one joke he used to tell when a group of journalist west were gathered in his house and we were sitting talking to him before the interview and he joked about how when he was in jail and the antiapartheid protests started he was told by someone a lot of the kids in london when they were protesting believed that free was his first name because free nelson mandela was the postcard placard they were holding up. t
can't or you're a bully. i think the best debate i ever had in my four elections is against a woman and i did so well at the end that i walked out going -- she was tough. she was attacking me on every single issue. it got personal. very angry. i sort of -- i brushed it off. but it was so bad that i was walking out and they were booing her and i walked out. i felt sorry for her. right? even though she had been attacking he in whole time boy that didn't go well. the next day in the newspaper the screaming headlines were that, you know, i was a bully and it was terrible. i never raised my voice because it just went so bad for tonally it was a surprising and jarring thing. the next day when you run a campaign against a woman, especially if you're a 6'4" man you got to take extra, extra care. >> right. but there's also a ton of studies and information and evidence that shows women are negatively portrayed when they express their views firmly. i have some sympathy with how men have to address women and you can't retaliate in a way you would against a guy but women are always being seen --
that were criticizing him. nelson mandela, i was on election observer in 1994, and mandela was being attacked by black nationalists that felt he sold out and de klerk by africaners that felt he sold out. they had to fight inside their own base to have this reconciliation which makes them even greater figures. how do you deal with having to balance those that are with you, think you're too soft, those that think you're too hard and find a way to go down the middle. that's where greatness is achieved. >> every revolutionary man or woman has that great challenge. >> absolutely. >> wow. >> let's look back to the 1961 when the 42-year-old activist gave his first televised interview. >> i went to see the man who organized this, a 42-year-old african lawyer nelson mandela the most dynamic man in south africa today. the police were hunting for him at the time but african nationalists arranged for me to meet him at his hide out. this is mandela's first television interview. i asked him what it was that the african really wanted. >> the africans require one franchise of one-man/one-vote. >> do
train workers and volunteers who would conduct the first multiracial elections in south africa. he was authentic. he was a giant. you know, when you were around him, you felt very special. he was joyful. he had a sense of humor, but there was this dignity about him, this strength about him. i will always remember his grace and his courage. >> and to donna's point, john, i want to bring you in. she talks about him being a giant. .headlines, these are one of the days you are looking at the headlines. "usa today" saying the death of a giant. you were there when nelson mandela was inaugurated in 1994. you've also covered many world events but you will never forget that moment. why? >> professionally it was the most powerful thing i've ever seen in my life. i say professionally because i carve out a special spot for my children. if you think of the day of inauguration, u.s. vice president al gore led the delegation. the ceremony was outside in what they call the union building, parliament building. it was the most dramatic, powerful moment of south african military brass, white generals
the minimum wage. democrats are now worried about heading into the midterm election, and with the senate up for grabs, so the president is going there, speaking to a liberal think tank, the center for american progress who is sponsoring the talk. he is bolstering his base, renewing some of his themes he has been talking about and setting his agenda not only for the state of the union speech coming up presumably last month, but also for the last three years of his presidency, stephanie. >> all right. we'll check back with you later >>> the president and other senior officials will take part in a youth summit at the white house. dozens of young people will gather to discuss the affordable care act, the economy and other important issues. >>> congress has a lot to get done before the end of the year, but it's not clear if the work will be finished since lawmakers don't plan to spend a lot of time in washington. libby casey good morning. what are the pressing items, and how much hope that they will getdown? >> there is not much time. they are only in session through next week. they plan to go i
in election for the first the team the country's first black president as. i therefore took a family. it's white domination. i have for it. freddie family arcades at the venetian. i chatted the iata. offer to south africa where all south africans. i get. there are many interesting reading and consultation batting and rank week while the key accompli the contents of the common good. his commitment to transform these twenty one team could move them. no negotiated with them president. read twenty third once in power. the seed stitch or at home week it's a crock. he is the cute and ninety five when he meets south africans would it be convenient it is a star. our cross racial audience. to make alice martin didn't go hungry. it is the day. for laying the basis for human rights. didn't have to be a good start. barroso site the county has promised to sue one. five year term as president. instead they are in nineteen nineteen there we continue to pray and ask to whom the media seems to settle conflicts in africa efforts to combat aids. he continued to be married people his philosophy. the eu se
the clarity of message or the attraction with the president. in 2004 they were calling specifically for re-elections. this time they want him to go or the government to step down for a new government. they are talking about obstruction measures, they want a change in the political system. these are ideas that are difficult to force concessions on. these are sitting with vladimir putin on friday. people want to know what he was discussing. this has been an this is a choice between europe or a choice between some kind of soviet union 2.4, they russia has a corrupting influence on the country. we'll see how things progress throughout the day. >> thank you for joining us from kiev. a car bomb attack from a police station in columbia killed eight people. it happened in a town south-east of the booingo tea. fighters known as farc are suspected of being behind the attack. leaders and officials are engaged in talks, trying to end a 50 year war that is taking 200,000 lives. >> 72 years ago this weekend pearl harbour was attacked. it was known as the day of infamy. 400 japanese plants bombarded -- planes bom
addresses, i've used his decision when elected president of south africa to invite that guard from his prison to be there as one of his honored guests at his inauguration as president of south africa. that, to me, speaks volumes. nelson mandela taught us powerful lessons about justice, tolerance and reconciliation. as the first democratically elected president of south africa, mandela was the father of a new nation, like george washington the father of our nation, he chose deliberately to walk away from power. in doing so he reminded us that peaceful, orderly transition of power is one of the hall machines of a real -- hallmarks of a real democracy. sadly this year, for the second year in a roarks the award committee wouldn't identify one african leader who met that standard. leaders in neighboring zimbabwe, egypt, cuba and so many other nations torn by conflict and manipulated division would do well to ponder this greatness of nelson mandela. at the end of persist presidency he came to washington to receive the congressional gold medal. this congressional gold medal is the highest hon
for the health care system, not just for the health of the participants but for the whole bloody election in november 2014. that's where we're going. >> if that happens. that's the big if. if companies, major companies that have been bearing the cost of health insurance at their volition since, you know, world war i, decide that this is somehow in their interest to start kicking offer their employees -- >> world war ii. >> exactly. world war ii, start kicking off their employees because they want to cut savings, they are going realize if they are working for a newspaper, their staff -- >> larry, i have to say, identify talked to small business owners who say that just paying the fine will more than soak up their profit margin opinion they will have to close their doors, lay everybody off. they are cutting back hours. paying the fine is way too much for them. they can't possibly afford this. >> i have to get out. very good discussion. i think the real winner is this guy zients. i think if obama had him around whatever three, four, six, 12, i don't know 36 months ago he would have been in b
the election of obama. >> here is former pennsylvania senator rick santorum comparing the fight against apartheid in south africa to the battle over obama care. >> he was fighting against some great injustice. i would make the argument we have a great injustice going on right now in this country with an ever-increasing size of government that has taken over and is controlling people's lives and obama care is front and center in that. >> ryan, what gives? >> i think we have to add apartheid -- >> f.w. de klerk, such a better person than mitch mcconnell. >> we have to add apartheid to that list of issues you shouldn't compare in modern american politics -- >> right. naziism, slavery, apartheid. >> there are issues that were unique historically and no matter how bad you think things are in american politics right now, comparisons are never going to be apt. >> nelson mandela supported universal health care. i think the comparison, like the pope, i think the comparison is kind of -- >> i would tell you this. i think neither side should be using the man, a dead man, deceased man we are honori
of the key elements of the majority's winning elections and majority in the senate. and for us to wait since, i believe, june when we passed the bill out of the armed services committee until just shortly, a short time ago and then only allowing a few days is really a grave disservice not so much to the members of the senate, but it's a grave disservice and a lack of prioritization of the importance of this legislation. and i'm deeply disappointed that the majority leader of the senate, because of his manipulation of the calendar has put us in this position. having said that, i spend time, as i know the senator from oklahoma and the senator from michigan, our distinguished chairman have, in the company of men and women who serve. one of our obligations as members of the armed services committee is to spend time with the military. i know that the senator from oklahoma does and the senator from -- the chairman does as well. and, you know, their morale isn't good. they've seen sequestration take place, across-the-board cuts that have been done with a meat-ax and not a scalpel. and all three of
in the big apple. new york mayor elect bill deblass yo announced bill bratton as new yorks's police commissioner. he ran the police force 20 years ago and he vowed to repair the relationship between officers and minority neighborhoods amid the nypd's controversial stop and frisk program, a tactic he has embraced in the pass while the incoming mayor has criticized it, bratton said a book he read when he was 9 will guide him on his new beat. >> i checked this thing out so often that i don't think anybody else in boston ever saw it. it is a book about the new york city police department of 1956 and i loved the title "your police." in this city, i want every new yorker to talk about their police, my police, with respect and with confidence that they are going to be respected. >> bratton has led the boston and los angeles police departments. >>> pope francis bringing another big change to the catholic church. the pontiff just launching a commission to prevent priests from sexually abusing young children and to help children who were victims of abuse. the new pope has faced some criticism
or not. >> we'll all be high for that election. >> i'm surprised he was at all defensive about it. let it go. >> one last thing, i want to bring in the sound from vice president cheney asked about this feud between his daughters, listen. >> we, you know, we are surprised when there was an attack launched against liz on facebook. it was always launched in the family because that is our preference. >> doesn't he sound like the godfather. we like to deal with it it in the family. this is clearly embarrassing for him. he is to the left of liz cheney on gay marriage. >> the attacks were -- >> he supports mary on the issue, but -- >> you know -- >> politics is the business we have chosen. >> another godfather reference, i appreciate it. coming up next, a frat house in the heart of capitol hill. the guys living in it are some of the most powerful members of congress. plus, not a new album in 20 years. ♪ ♪ stacy's mom has got it goin' on ♪ ♪ stacy's mom has got it goin' on ♪ ♪ stacy's mom has got it goin' on ♪ [ male announcer ] the beautifully practical and practically beautiful
elected twice is young people, so-called millennials. folks at harvard has a unit that polled these folks. 18 to 25, bad news for the president, festival his approval rating down to 41%. that is a reflection of the population at large but down 11% since just this spring. and john earlier the president did some work to shore up the forecast, the so-called -- shore up the rveght affordable care a% of millennials disapprove of the affordable care act. have no plans to sign up. that's disappointing news. >> the numbers behind inequality could be surprising for many. jonathan betz has a closer look at what the president says is an economic inequality gap. >> simply put the poor are getting poorer and the rich are getting richer. first off, what does this mean? the median income for an american household was $53,000, down $yea from the year before and down $5,000 from 1999 when you adjust for inflation. but the economy is growing. however almost all of the money that's being made is going to the very rich. since 2009 the income of the top 1% grew by 31%. money is being made, but only for about
a core constituency that got him elected, that 19-24-year-old, a 41% approval rating. most concerning for the affordable care act is the poll asked young people will they enroll in the affordable care act. this group of young invincibles is key to have their involvement to make it work. 47% of the millennials 18-29 said they will not enrol. 57% it's approved. greater than the national average among the entire population. >> mike viqueira at the white house. >>> to illustrate the gap the highest 1% saw income rise an average of 31%. for everybody else it was less than one half of a per cent. let's bring in paolo romanacci, a married father of two who created the blog middleclasshell.com. welcome, it's good to see you. >> thanks for having me. >> what does middle class hell mean to you - not the blog, the term? >> it means that we are stuck in a position where we cannot advance economically, socially - that this - that the deck is stacked against us and we have little chance of breaking out of the dilemma that we are in >> this has been coming on for a while. how many years has it gone
obama care. now you look at another core constituency. we heard after the election about the latino vote in america. look at the latest poll out of gallup. the support of of the president has gone down 23% among hispanic voters. that's a huge discrepancy. from where he was a year ago. >> and the reason -- now this is not obviously a good law for the american people. but politically, the reason why this is valuable is it's exposing the president for what he's about. he's all about making promises that aren't coming true. now people are getting the reality of what barack obama is about in their mailbox. the difference between this scandal and many others is this is affecting millions of people in their bank account losing their doctor, their health care. this is just the beginning. just wait until employers have the option of dumping their insurance and throwing people on these exchanges. >> let me ask you this. we know the federal renlster back in july of oh 2010. they knew the individual policies, it could be as high as 80% of americans would lose them. they also said 60 some odd percent
the first democratcly elected government of egypt. he received nearly 500,000 votes from time readers, 26 percent of the total. time says he got massive support from people in egypt who generated largest number of votes in the poll understandably. turkey president came in second with miley cyrus in third. no fooling. official time person of the year is chosen by the magazine editor and will be announced next wednesday. i doubt it's miley but we'll see. >> electric guitar bob dill land famously played in the 1965 newport folk if he is have sold at auction today for 9 65,000 dollars. it is a record for guitar sold at auction. christy says absentee buyer purchased the fender guitar it was move from acoustic to electric rock and roll. guitar has been in the possession of new jersey family for nearly 50 years. dillon left it open a pr by the owner's late father. >> craft brew industry is boo booming but many of the brew are sold in limited 80's and that is creating a black market now. brewers say they are seeing some beer offered for hundreds of dollars. particularly once that are har
elected president of all south africans. i know that i speak on behalf of people in my constituency, holborn and st pancras, because they have a very special relationship with the anti- apartheid movement. the movement was founded at a meeting of about 60 people in holborn hall in the summer of 1959. its first leaflets were distributed a fortnight later outside camden town underground station. its headquarters were always located in our area, and it always had our support. local people were particularly delighted when mr mandela came to camden town in july 2003 to unveil a blue plaque in memory of ruth first, who was murdered by the south african secret police, and joe slovo, who was a member of president mandela's first cabinet. i am delighted that his daughter gillian slovo is here to observe our proceedings. over many years, committed people in britain campaigned against apartheid, the trials of the leaders of the african national congress and the imprisonments that followed. they continued to campaign against the oppression of all black south africans and of all the other people
. >> president clinton who was in the white house when mandel was elected president of south africa. the two developed a close personal relationship. bill clinton says, quote, all of us are living in a better world because of the life that madiba lived. he proved that there is freedom in forgiving that a big heart is better than a closed mind and that life's real victories must be shared. >> jimmy carter also saying the following. to think of their parents and grandparents the different world they are seeing. we will have more coverage of nelson mandela's legacy still to come on "early start." >>> we are following the vast majority of the united states dealing with the effects of a deep freeze, including major travel headaches. more than 500 flights have been precanceled. so bad they are canceling them before they are supposed to take off! they have been canceled around the country because of the bitter weather. >> getting around by car not easier. icy conditions call that seven vehicle wreck along interstate 540 in northern arkansas. four people tenth so the hospital and we are told their i
for reconciliation and forgiveness. four years after his release he was elected president. nelson mandela was 95 years old. he had been ill on and off for more than a year. he passed peacefully surrounded by his family. >>> students will probably be wide awake at one south bay community college. in the next half hour we will show you why students have to deal with the freezing cold even when they are inside the classroom. >>> and $7 for a gallon of milk? it might sound ridiculous now but prices could reach record highs next month. the washington stalemate that could wreck your budget. >>> born. right now we are looking at a commute that is still doing very well as we put up a live picture of highway 4. it looks good here but i will tell you where it is beginning to show some signs of slowing. >>> outside our doors this morning. joined by record breaking temperatures once again in some areas. we will compare the numbers and in the extended forecast for your bay area weekend rain and local snow. i love having a free checked bag with my united mileageplus explorer card. i've saved $75 in checked ba
of the union speech, but in the coming months election cycle. >> let's continue with gloria bor borger. what is the president attempting to establish today? >> one is an issue of poverty and inequality. he started his career organizing poor people in chicago. this is an issue i thought he would come back to in this term and he has. the other part of this is look, this is not much different from the conversation we had in 2012 about -- it's equality stupid. he is taking it back to the issues of expanding for the middle class, that republicans didn't have a good answer for in 2012. >> i think you heard it we have all heard it. i think this is a way to lay the groundwork for ib inequality issues. what you do with medicare, medicaid, and i think he sort of is dipping his toe into that now a little bit early. >> i do think that cornell is right. this is a base that has been demoralized in the last few weeks and months because of the debacle that has been the obama care rollout. it is important to republican that to listen to that speech today, you would have to think he has not been president for
election papers. he is still under investigation, something sherwood equated to a wet mattress hanging over his campaign. how tough would it be for the mayor to run with a wet mattress hanging over his head? >> it won't be easy, there's no question about that. the reality is that many of the people who are convinced that the 2010 campaign was corrupt have already decided that they're not going to be able to support mayor gray. so to my way of thinking, he is actually benefiting from all of these other high-profile candidates getting into the race. the more widely the vote is divided, the better it is for him. he may do what harry thomas used to do when he was running and win by 30% of the vote because all the anti incumbent vote has been divide among so many candidates. >> bowser saying now that he's running he will have to answer questions, tommy wells saying he doesn't deserve a second chance because of the shadow of the 2010 campaign. >> a lot of that, i think, is campaign talk on these candidates running against mayor gray. but i think a lot -- i heard tommy wells the other day. he's pu
to get any agreement on those areas. particularly in election year. the house is expected to adjourn for the year on friday and the senate shortly after. a lot of high-profile legislation still hanging in the balance. it is the list of what is likely to make it through the 113th congress. i think the only thing that is likely to get through is the defense authorization act. will see what gets included. one thing we will be watching is to see whether any legislation sanctioning iran is added to that bill. the administration is doing everything it can to prevent congress from doing that but a lot of members are still interested in adding sanctions to iran. another thing to watch for is the farm bill. if they cannot get a deal they are going to have to extend existing -- finally the senate are here for and asked her week. they will look at a lot of nominations, particularly after the filibuster changes republicans ran through a couple of weeks ago. among the big nominees are the new chairwoman of the federal reserve, jackie ellen. -- a number of articles suggest this is the most unprodu
on the constitution by those elected and then went on to revive, restore and preserve that constitution for the many generations of americans who followed. yield back. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to clause 12-a of rule 1, the chair declares the house noon today.til you can watch that hearing live, the veterans' affairs subcommittee, at 3:00 eastern on c-span2. at the white house today in just a few minutes, president obama is expected to be talking about the economy, reiterating his call for raising the minimum wage. he's speaking at an event at the center for american progress. we'll have that live for you once it gets under way here on c-span. >> friday on c-span -- "washington journal" looks at the mission and role of the national institutes of health starting live at 7:00 eastern with director francis collins on future projects and the impact of sequestration. at 8:00, allergy and infectious disease anthony fauci followed by director green, director of the human genome institute. at 9:00, national institutes director harold varmus and at 9:30, a look at the national institutes of mental he
're heading into a midterm does that indicate this could be a tough issue for some democrats in tough re-election battles. >> it could. this is not an issue swing voters are necessarily focused on. this is about the democratic base, social justice, issues that rile up the base. to some extent, i think the president is trying to get enthusiasm from his base. you have today and the last couple of weeks protests around the cover over the issue of minimum wage and fast food. >> timely. >> this is timely, cutting edge, coupled with a push to raise the minimum wage which appears to the base. there are political risks for the president. he's framing this as a moral issue. you have a fascinating dynamic. the super rich and the middle class, stock market all-time but poverty also at an all-time high. >> the united states still manufacturers more than any other country in the world, something that people lose site of because of what's happened with china. it's easy to say raise the minimum wage. another thing to get it done politically. >> yes. >> isn't the real challenge finding ways to get higher paying
was elected the first black president of south africa. colin powell was talking earlier in the show, i was sad whe i heard the news b i immediately got a smile on my face thinking about this man's legacy and what he did for the worl >> the fact that he lived. he lived suc an incredible life. my sister worked in south africa actually and one thing people haven't talked about as much is his stance on hiv/aids. it changed the entire continent and not the world. >> no black president i that countrwas talking about it. >> and they were saying he wasn't a disease. >> he had a son that died of aids. richard ele is outside mandela's home where crowds have been gatheng to mourn but also to celebrate mandela'slife. richard, good morning. >> reporter: good morning. we are in johannesburg outside of mandela's me, t same home where he dd l lt night and since his passing hundreds of people have been coming here. ey have been laying flowers and singing and dancing. a very celebratory mood. perhaps mandels greatest legacy is that of reconciliation and that is represented today. there are black south africans
the segregation that was so deeply devisive and it was sharper when they elected a white government that passed laws taking segregation to an extreme, complete racial separation, the resettlement of 3 million people to black home lands, denying their right to vote and travel stripping them of citizenship. nelson mandela was only 30. he soon became convinced peaceful demonstrations would never be enough to uproot the oppressive racist structure and he helped form and run an armed gorilla movement, bomb ings and sabotage in the early 60s led to his arrest and prosecution along with others in the movement. convicted but spared a death sentence mandela would spend more than a quarter of a century, 27 years behind prison walls. 18 of those years at the robin island. outside the antiapartheid fight only grew more fierce, the oppression and violence focused the attention of the world on the depths of racism and boycotts choked off the economy and mandela was the most famous prisoner in the world. the powerful international condemnation and growing domestic unrest chipped away at apartheid until finall
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